Adam, Eve, and Paul: Discerning the Role of Women in the Mission of God

A Theological Reflection on 1st Timothy 2:11-15

Regarding Paul’s writings about the role of women in the church, William Mounce has written, “If it could be proven that elsewhere Paul allows women to teach… authoritatively within the context of the household of God, then it would have to be concluded that Paul is inconsistent or [has] been misunderstood.”[1] L. T. Johnson has suggested that Paul was “nervous” about the role of women in the church. He offers a very helpful discussion on the various hermeneutical options that inform interpretation. He concludes that the only viable option “is to engage the words of Paul in a dialectical process of criticism within the public discourse of the church, both academic and liturgical.”[2]

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Washed and Waiting: Reflections on Christian Faithfulness and Homosexuality – A Review

Washed and Waiting  -<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
        By: Wesley Hill</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
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I have served as a pastor for more than thirty years. The most difficult issues I have faced have been matters of love. Time after time I have talked with people who have been deeply hurt by the people they love and trust most. These issues of love, devotion, affection, attraction, and sexuality are the dirty secrets that have consumed a great deal of my time as a shepherd of God’s people. Love may be bliss, but it is fraught with difficulty and pain. Consider the many painful situations associated with love and sex:

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The Nuances of Racism

This post was edited and updated on 8/20/2014.

When we talk about racism or bigotry most people are not aware of the nuances involved. Racism is a term filled with political nuance. Believe it or not, there is a distinction between being a racist and a bigot. A bigot may harbor malicious and hateful thoughts against another because of race, nationality, or religion. But a bigot lacks the power or motive to act. If one is a bigot, but has power and motive, then that is racism. Racism is inherently oppressive. Jim Crow laws were racist because they had the force of law and the support of a bigoted populace. Keep in mind that to be racist implies the political, social, and economic power to oppress a group of human beings because of their race.

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